Category Archives: Workshop announcements

Ethics, Transparency, and Trust: The Ethical Intelligence Professional

The fifth in The Future of Professional Ethics Workshop series at Indiana University will be hosted by the Maurer School of Law,  Friday, April 15, 9:30 am-noon, in Maurer Law School 125, via Twitter #FutureEthics, and live stream.

Seminar poster

The keynote speaker is Alexander W. Joel, Civil Liberties Protection Officer, Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

Mr. Joel will discuss how ethical principles can help ensure that intelligence agencies pursue their national security mission in a manner that reflects the nation’s values while coping with constant and fast-paced change and striving to build and maintain public trust through transparency.

Agenda

  • Part I — Maurer Law School 125
    • 9:30 am – 10:30 am — Keynote
    • 10:30 am – 11:30 am — Perspectives from IU faculty with expertise in areas such as whistleblowing, cryptography, law, and leadership, plus a public Q&A period
  • Part II — Poynter Center
    • 12:00 noon – 1:30 pm – – A panel of past and current professionals from the intelligence community, including the CIA and the US Attorney’s office, will continue the discussion over lunch.

NOTE Please notify lescoope@indiana.edu by Monday, April 11th to be included in the catering order, or feel free to bring your own brown bag lunch.

 

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Professionals without Borders: Cosmopolitan Ethics and the Global Imaginary

The fourth in The Future of Professional Ethics Workshop series at Indiana University Bloomington will be hosted by The Media School, Friday, April 1, 9:00 am-noon, in Woodburn Hall 111 and online: #FutureEthics

Seminar poster

The keynote speaker is Clifford Christians, Professor Emeritus of Communication, of Media Studies, and Journalism, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Abundant electronic technologies are reinventing the globe as mobile territory, with transit and portability the new normal.  Digital mediation typically means that we exist “everywhere always and nowhere never.”  Professionalism is now a borderless phenomenon in a deep and profound way unknown before in history.  The media are a technological regime at the meaning-edge of the technological revolution; therefore the media professions are a privileged laboratory for understanding professional theory and practice as a whole in the digital era.  The challenge in an age of the instantaneous and momentary is to develop a cosmopolitan ethics, cosmopolitanism known in history as “citizens of the world.”  Now this idea ought to be the defining imperative for teaching, research, and professional practice.  The globe is an imaginary, and instead of it being imagined as neoliberal markets or nation states, Heidegger’s humanocentric philosophy of technology should construct our global imagination.  Within that global imaginary, a cosmopolitan ethics begins with universal human solidarity rather than the traditional ethics of individual autonomy.  A credible commitment to humanity’s intrinsic worth is possible if our education of students and training of professionals is rooted in the liberal arts where questions of life’s purpose and moral philosophy predominate.

Made Possible by  College of Arts and Sciences Ostrom Grants Program.

Sponsored by Association for Practical and Professional Ethics; Department of Business, Law & Ethics, Kelley School of Business; Division of Informatics, School of Informatics and Computing; Maurer School of Law; Media School; Medical Sciences Program; Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics; School of Education; School of Optometry; School of Public and Environmental Affairs; School of Public Health–Bloomington; School of Social Work.

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Call for Papers: The Past, Present and Future of Applied Ethics

Call for Papers

10th International Conference on Applied Ethics:
‘The Past, Present and Future of Applied Ethics’
October 28-30 (Fri–Sun), 2016
Hosted by the Center for Applied Ethics and Philosophy (CAEP)
Hokkaido University (Sapporo, Japan)

We are delighted to announce the 10th International Conference on Applied Ethics on October 28-30 (Fri–Sun), 2016, at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan.

We invite papers written towards the conference theme in applied ethics, broadly construed, that address philosophical, political, economic, social, and cultural issues in applied ethics.

This includes, but is not limited to: meta/normative ethics, bio/medical ethics, engineering ethics, ethics of science and technology, information ethics, research ethics, environmental ethics, business ethics, professional ethics, feminist/gender/sexuality ethics, philosophy of sex, political philosophy, moral psychology, and international/global ethics.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Ruth Chadwick (Manchester)
  • Michael Davis (Illinois Institute of Technology)
  • Peter G. Stone (Newcastle)
  • Stephen Ward (British Columbia)

Those participants who wish to present papers are requested to submit a 150–300 word abstract in a MS-Word file (.doc) to CAEP (caep@let.hokudai.ac.jp) by May 31 (Tue), 2016.

Presented papers may be considered for publication in both our print and electronic journal upon submission and review.

Up to ten travel awards of between 20,000 and 30,000 JPY (equivalent to approx. 180–270 USD) are available for overseas graduate students and non-tenured scholars who present papers. The grant application form is available from the CAEP webpage. (Application Deadline: May 31 (Tue), 2016)

For further details, please visit our website: http://ethics.let.hokudai.ac.jp

All queries should be sent to: caep@let.hokudai.ac.jp

Center for Applied Ethics and Philosophy
Graduate School of Letters
Hokkaido University
N10 W7, Kita-ku
Sapporo 060-0810
Japan

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Developing and Defending Your Ethical Professional Brand

The third in The Future of Professional Ethics Workshop series at Indiana University Bloomington will be hosted by the School of Public & Environmental Affairs, Friday, January 29, 11:30-1:30 pm, in SPEA 169* and online: #FutureEthics

Seminar poster

The keynote speaker is Trish Tchume, First Executive Director of the Young Nonprofit Professionals Network.

  • 11:30-12:30: Keynote
  • 12:30-1:00: Responses by IU Faculty
  • 1:00-1:30: Pizza and open discussion period

Young professionals across sectors can expect that they will need to move between organizations and adapt to a variety of contexts, all while acquiring new knowledge and skills.  Cultivating a sense of one’s own professional identity or brand can be a challenge; doing so with integrity and attention to ethical priorities is essential.  Join Trish Tchume for an introduction to this topic, followed by a panel discussion and workshop session.  Tchume, a member of the inaugural class of American Express NGen Fellows, is a writer and activist, and she served as the first Executive Director of the Young Nonprofit Professionals Network. 

*BUILDING UNDER CONSTRUCTION! Updated tips on how to access it here: http://speabuildingblog.blogspot.com/2016/01/new-year-new-construction-preparations.html.

Made Possible by  College of Arts and Sciences Ostrom Grants Program.

Sponsored by Association for Practical and Professional Ethics; Department of Business, Law & Ethics, Kelley School of Business; Division of Informatics, School of Informatics and Computing; Maurer School of Law; Media School; Medical Sciences Program; Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics; School of Education; School of Optometry; School of Public and Environmental Affairs; School of Public Health–Bloomington; School of Social Work.

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Research Integrity Inside the Beltway: Looking Back and Looking Forward

The Association for Practical and Professional Ethics is pleased to announce “Research Integrity Inside the Beltway: Looking Back and Looking Forward.” This pre-conference workshop will precede the main program of the 25th Annual Meeting of the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics (APPE) in Reston, Virginia.

This is an exciting time as we reflect on significant achievements in the field, current issues, policy and program mandates, and new challenges.  Our presenters will discuss the research integrity issues their agencies and organizations address, thedifficulties involved in developing policy, and the future of research and policy on research integrity.

The workshop will feature a report from the 4th World Conference on Research Integrity (provided by Elizabeth Heitman and Daniel Vasgird), and presentations by the following invited speakers:

  1. Tom Arrison, Program Director for Development, Security, and Cooperation
    National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
  1. Daniel Denecke, Vice President, Best Practices and Strategic Initiatives
    Council of Graduate Schools
  1. Francesca Grifo, Scientific Integrity Official
    Environmental Protection Agency
  1. Zoë Hammatt, Director, Division of Education and Integrity
    Office of Research Integrity
  1. Allison C. Lerner, Inspector General
    National Science Foundation
  1. Heather Pierce, Sr. Director, Science Policy & Regulatory Counsel
    American Association of Medical Colleges

The pre-conference workshop will take place on February 18th, 2016, from 9-4, and the main conference program will begin at 4:00 and continue through Saturday, February 20th.

Workshop attendees are invited to register and attend the main conference program which features a presentation by Christine Grady (NIH) and peer-reviewed presentations on a number of topics in research integrity, bioethics, business ethics, environmental ethics, and moral theory. Registration for the workshop is $110, and is separate from registration for the conference.

December 10, 2015

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Ethics and Electronic Health Records: Privacy, Professionalism, Provider Burden, and Patient Control

Announcing a seminar in the Future of Professional and Practical Ethics series sponsored by the Indiana University Center for Law, Ethics and Applied Research in Health Information (CLEAR) and the IU Center for Bioethics.

Seminar poster

Ethics and Electronic Health Records

Privacy, Professionalism,
Provider Burden, and Patient Control

Electronic health records (EHRs) are transforming health care and creating new ethical challenges for clinicians, researchers, and patients. In this session, an expert on ethics and computers in medicine will address central issues for the EHR era.

Presenter: Kenneth W. Goodman, PhD
Professor and Director, Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy,
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and
Director, WHO Collaborating Center in Global Health and Policy

Moderator: Peter H. Schwartz, MD, PhD
Faculty Investigator, IU Center for Bioethics,
Associate Professor of Medicine, IU School of Medicine, and
Associate Professor of Philosophy, IUPUI

Thursday, November 12, 2015
Noon – 1 PM
Health Information & Translational Science (HITS) Building
Room 1110
410 W. 10th St., Indianapolis, IN

See the IU Center for Bioethics page in the Compendium.

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